Oceania at the RA

 

Here are some pictures from my visit(s) to the Oceania show at the Royal Academy.  The show marks 250 years since captain Cook’s first voyage to the Pacific.

a stylised human head holding a bird

The show is arranged in themes. The Nguzunguzu carving above is a canoe figurehead from the Solomon Islands which features in the first room along with canoes, paddles, maps and other voyaging art and objects.

There were some familiar works like the Papua New Guinea flute stopper above left and some things I’d never seen before like the fantastic necklace made of whale’s teeth, above right.

There are works from many parts of Oceania, contrasting the different styles that have evolved in different islands and regions. The first crocodile above is a canoe prow carving from Papua New Guinea while the second is from the Solomon Islands.

Styles vary within a region, such as the gods Ku and Lono from Hawaii above left and center, and from region to region— like the Papua New Guinea ancestor figure on the right.

The show is on until the 10th December so  there’s still time to go, don’t miss it!

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Screen Printing part 2

The next technique we learned in our screen printing class was photo stencilling.

You can turn almost any image into a photo stencil, but  simple black and white images make it easy to produce a good stencil.

After some messing around in my sketchbook, I managed to scribble this on the back of an envelope.Marquesan style Tiki mask

I then traced it digitally and printed it onto tracing paper. You can use tracing paper or acetate as your ‘film positive’ to expose a screen.

Here are the final prints.

Screen print of a Marquesan style maskAn oceanic mask with tribal patterns